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Sale 104: The Alan Parsons Collection

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10 Select Items

Lot 2230    

1909, 4¢ orange brown, bluish paper, o.g., never hinged, bright and fresh with rich bold color on distinctively bluish paper, fresh and Fine; with 1980 P.F. certificate.
Scott No. 360    $80,000.

AN EXTREMELY RARE EXAMPLE OF THE OF THE 1909 4¢ BLUISH PAPER RARITY IN NEVER HINGED CONDITION.

According to Johl, the only source of the 4¢ and 8¢ Bluish paper stamps was the archives of the Post Office Department. Approximately 80 of each were traded for rare stamps missing from the archives with approximately eight examples remain in never hinged condition.

all lots for this sale will be subject to a 18% buyer's premium

Current Opening Bid: $8,000

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Lot 2217 o   

1908, 4¢ brown, imperf, wavy line machine cancel, margins huge showing full Schermack type III perfs and guideline at right to just shaving design at lower left, rich deep color, F.-V.F.; with P.F. certificate #43890 which states "Genuine" & as does 2021 P.F. certificate.
Scott No. 314A    $50,000.

A VERY RARE AND CHOICE SOUND EXAMPLE OF THE 1908 4¢ IMPERFORATE WITH SCHERMACK TYPE III PERFORATIONS - WITH ONLY FORTY TWO USED EXAMPLES RECORDED AND THE ONLY USED EXAMPLE BEARING A GUIDELINE.

In April of 1908, the Schermack Company received orders of a 4¢ denomination from two of their Detroit clients, the Burroughs Adding Machine Company and the Hamilton Carbardt Company. Altogether, 10,000 stamps were ordered and 25 sheets were sent by the Bureau without perforations on May 12th, 1908.

According to the Siegel Census, only 32 used singles are recorded. Only eleven of these are deemed sound.

all lots for this sale will be subject to a 18% buyer's premium

Current Opening Bid: $8,500

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Lot 2300    

1923, 2¢ Harding, flat plate printing, imperforate error, left margin plate no. "14870" block of 12, o.g., never hinged (short gum at left with a few light natural gum bends), large margins, fresh with deep color, Very Fine.
Scott No. 610b    $25,000 for plate block of 6.

ONE OF THREE KNOWN PLATE BLOCKS OF THE 1923 2¢ HARDING IMPERFORATE ERROR ISSUE WITH PLATE NUMBER "14870" - A PLATE THAT WAS SOLELY USED FOR THE PERFORATED FLAT PLATE ISSUE.

A single imperforate pane of 100 from plate 14870 was discovered in a post office pad of 100 panes of normal perforated stamps. Despite the fact that the pane had been "blue-penciled" for destruction at the Bureau, it had somehow been distributed with the normal panes. A month and a half later, when the 2¢ black Harding was officially issued imperforate (Scott #611), it was printed from a different set of plates, thereby allowing only the imperforates with plate number 14870 attached to be positively identified as coming from the error sheet. All others became indistinguishable from the regularly issued imperforates.

all lots for this sale will be subject to a 18% buyer's premium

Current Opening Bid: $6,750

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Lot 2310 o   

1923, 2¢ Harding, rotary press printing, the rare perf 11, line machine cancel, centered to the lower right, strong color, Fine; with 1985 P.F. certificate.
Scott No. 613    $35,000 in the grade of fine.

AN ATTRACTIVE EXAMPLE OF THE 1923 2¢ HARDING ROTARY PERF 11 ISSUE - A GREAT 20TH CENTURY RARITY.

The Harding Memorial stamps mark one of the quickest turnarounds from concept to delivery in the history of U.S. postage stamps. President Harding, the 29th president of the U.S., died of a heart attack on August 2, 1923. Less than a month later a memorial stamp honoring his presidency was issued. How the Bureau of Engraving and Printing managed to print over one and one half billion stamps in 3 months is also something of a miracle. It is possible the haste at which this stamp was produced might be at least partially behind one of the great rarities of 20th century U.S. stamps, the rotary press sheet waste stamp perforated 11x11. The stamp was printed on the rotary presses, but was perforated on the flat plate, perf 11 equipment, rather than with the normal perf 10 perforating machines used to perforate the rotary press stamps of the time.

all lots for this sale will be subject to a 18% buyer's premium

Current Opening Bid: $6,750

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Lot 2256 o   

1920, 2¢ deep rose, type Ia, unwatermarked, imperf, wavy line machine cancel, showing Schermack type III perforations in right margin, margins to slightly in at left, rich distinctive deep rose color, Fine; with 1975 P.F. certificate.
Scott No. 482A    $65,000.

A HANDSOME EXAMPLE OF THE 1920 2¢ TYPE IA IMPERFORATE WITH SCHERMACK TYPE III PRIVATE PERFORATIONS.

Scott 482A was issued imperforate by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing and sold to the Schermack Company for use in its patented stamp-affixing machines. The Schermack "Sealer and Stamper" machine typically applied stamps one at a time, and, in most cases, the hyphen-hole perfs on one side would be cut off as a result of the cutting blade not aligning with the space between stamps. The release of imperforate sheets printed from the experimental Type Ia plates escaped the notice of contemporary collectors, resulting in a very small survival rate.

all lots for this sale will be subject to a 18% buyer's premium

Current Opening Bid: $5,250

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Lot 2194 ()   

1875, 15¢ bright orange, C.B.N.C. "Hard Paper" Special Printing, without gum as issued, rich vivid color, choice centering with scissor separations showing full perforations on three sides, Extremely Fine, only 38 certified examples are recorded; signed Ward, with 1990 P.F. certificate.
Scott No. 174    $15,500.

AN EXCEPTIONAL SOUND EXAMPLE OF THE RARE 1875 15¢ CONTINENTAL SPECIAL PRINTING ISSUE.

all lots for this sale will be subject to a 18% buyer's premium

Current Opening Bid: $6,000

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Lot 2203 ()   

1880, 30¢ greenish black, A.B.N.C. "Soft Paper" Special Printing, without gum as issued, deep intense color, attractively centered, Very Fine, a very rare Special Printing issue in sound condition, ex-Caspary & Karasch; with 1957 and 1990 P.F. certificates.
Scott No. 201    $20,000.

A CHOICE SOUND EXAMPLE OF THE RARE 1880 30¢ AMERICAN SPECIAL PRINTING ISSUE.

all lots for this sale will be subject to a 18% buyer's premium

Current Opening Bid: $4,000

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Lot 2198 ()   

1880, 1¢ dark ultramarine, A.B.N.C. "Soft Paper" Special Printing, without gum as issued, rich bold color, reperfed at top with tiny inclusion in Franklin's head, Very Fine appearance; with 1989 P.F. certificate.
Scott No. 192    $57,500.

AN ATTRACTIVE APPEARING EXAMPLE OF THE 1880 1¢ AMERICAN BANKNOTE SPECIAL PRINTING ISSUE - ONE OF THE RAREST OF ALL SPECIAL PRINTING ISSUES.

all lots for this sale will be subject to a 18% buyer's premium

Current Opening Bid: $3,750

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Lot 2088 ()   

1855, 10¢ green, type I, no gum, large margins and rich color, Extremely Fine and rare, a lovely unused example; with 2021 P.F. certificate.
Scott No. 13    $8,500 for no gum.

A RARELY OFFERED, COMPLETELY SOUND UNUSED 10¢ TYPE I.

all lots for this sale will be subject to a 18% buyer's premium

Current Opening Bid: $3,500

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Lot 2092    

1857, 1¢ blue, type Ia, position 100L4, full o.g., remarkably wide margins with wide break in outer line at top and full scrolls clearly visible at bottom, beautiful deep rich color enhancing this nearly complete design, reperfed at right, Extremely Fine appearance; with 1988 P.F. certificate.
Scott No. 19    $42,500 for the grade of fine.

AN EXCEPTIONAL APPEARING MINT ORIGINAL GUM EXAMPLE OF THE 1857 1¢ TYPE IA ISSUE AND CERTAINLY ONE OF THE FINEST APPEARING EXAMPLES EXTANT.

Produced only from 18 of the 20 subjects in the bottom row of both panes of Plate 4, the 1¢ imperforate, type Ia owes it's rarity to the short three month period that the Plate 4 imperforates where produced.

all lots for this sale will be subject to a 18% buyer's premium

Current Opening Bid: $3,500

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